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] e-mail welcome to this evening in the broadcast of morning joe. the energy in this room is a real testament of two things. one is how this issue of education reform has been a combination of talent that we see in this room and how it has coalesced around this issue of new technologies. that there really is a sense that the moment has arrived and the other is jeb bush. [applause] >> i'm a great believer that two things matter. one is ideas and the other is people. that is the real driver of change. it is the driver of history. this includes the coming together of a person with real talent and drive. this is one of them. so again, the fact that you are all here is the greatest. condoleezza rice and i come out of the national security background. when we were youngsters, we used to mess around with iran bomb calculator. and he used to calculate what was known as the circular error probable of the blast effects of nuclear weapons. here we are today, we have traveled a considerable difference. we have traveled a considerable distance. they didn't say al qaeda or iran or north korea, wh
to climate policy, energy efficiency gets you in the same direction. and as the senator said, that is something on which congress has demonstrated as recently as the last five or six years that it can come together, and i think it could do it again and in a more aggressive way to get advantage of the opportunities which we now know that we have. some states have already experienced it and by the way some of the regulars of electricity like california and new york have figured out how to make it attractive to energy providers, electricity providers to provide more efficiency to the ed vintage of the consumer by to reducing rates so there are many things we would be able to agree on and advance the cause of the carbonizing the economy. >> the diversity of fuel sources as well as efficiency travel parallel to the interest of the environmental policy in my judgment. >> we did, the congress did agree on the standards and the administration has continued to work in the industry to move those numbers up even more so there is a classic example of how we did something. >> i wondered i
. oel kline, get rid of the department of energy. one government, 100,000 kids in arizona will now have $5,000 voucher, public school or private school or home school. if they don't spend it -- you don't need more money. given the post office, your letters arrive sooner or would allow fedex or ups to deliver mail to make the post office mail different. >> we are really getting that. one more question. when you leave here very shortly, you go to a wednesday meeting, a liberal meeting of the right wing -- this is a weekly meeting you have had -- >> some of the people are from there. >> this is a weekly meeting of what you call a center-right coalition. you have several meetings, 60 of them around the country. this is a place where congress, people from think takes toward generally agree get together, 150 people, sometimes 20 of them will speak. what you going to tell them? what is your message? >> the reason people come to my meeting is i don't tell me things. if i talk, everybody gets -- 33 people attempt and we will overtime be candid. field kinks and activist groups, running the republ
the energy was in the center. the passage was in the center. today it's shifted to the wings of the political parties who control their agendas. john mccain the original sponsor of the bill now denounces his own hanley work. -- handiwork. let's hope in the post election atmosphere this dynamic can change and mccain can proudly support his very own bill. let me close by noting i do think america is exceptional. it is the global melding pot, a place where the universal nation is being created. we may not do immigration better than anyone any more, but we do asimulation better than anyone. people from all over the world come to this country and almost magically become real americans but part of being a real american is urging the country to look at its flaws and change them. let's get started. >>> as president obama readies for a second term, i wondered who could best shed light on the challenges he faces and how to deal with them. the president is an avid student of american history so i thought it was fitting to ask two great pulitzer prize-winning historians to sit down with me. robert caro h
senators trent lott and byron dorgan will lead a discussion on u.s. energy policy. at the national press club. the leaders are currently co-chairs of the bipartisan policy center's energy project. topics will include development and domestic gas and oil production, energy security threats and environmental challenges. that would be like at 10 a.m. eastern again on our companion network c-span. at 11:30 a.m. majority whip dick durbin will talk about the so-called fiscal cliff and deficit reduction at the center for american progress. fiscal cliff, a combination of those expiring tax provisions and budget cuts that could take place the beginning of the new you. they include the bush-era tax cuts and sequestration. live coverage starts at 1130 eastern also on c-span. we are likely to about the fiscal cliff during the senate session today getting underway at 10 a.m. eastern, just over a half hour from now. after the gavel and majority leader reid will be recognized to speak and will likely outlined the schedule for the day which could include debate on defense programs and policy, and possib
? guest: besides health care, you touched on a couple of things. energy independence. high energy costs impact seniors more than any other segment in society. we have said we need to develop our own domestic energy sources. i read recently where the united states will surpass saudi arabia in oil production in a few more years. we have so many energy resources at our disposal, shale energy. fracking up in pennsylvania, new york, north dakota. hydraulic fracking has been around 55 or 60 years, but it has been too expensive. with new technologies, a can and does produce oil and natural gas. we have it would hundred year supply of natural gas. our over dependence on oil resources from unfriendly nations, we call that a clear and present danger to the national security. we think it is a clear and present danger to the economic security. we have to bring down the cost of energy. on top of that, the taxes during the fiscal clef. tax's impact seniors more than any segment. there is a tax called the estate tax. we call it the death tax. a lot of seniors are impacted by that. we are keeping an ey
against? jon? >> i think it's energy independence because it changes our national security posture in fundamental ways, would re-orient the world and give us a way of standing by ourselves, without having to be constantly drawn into regions of the world that have not been hospitable to us. chris: annette? >> i think health care is still part of that. we haven't totally settled the relationship, and that is a question that was posed in this election and will continue. chris: this is amazing. had the election gone the other way by 4% or so, hr-1 would be elimination of health care. unbelievable. >> i think the presidency is with science and engineering. even despite the current budget deficiencies, he would like to pour more money into american innovation. chris: that's what we do. >> right. >> as your fine book says, kennedy spent only $15 million in 1960, not that much by current standards. this year romney and obama spent $1 billion each. find some way to change the system so that you can run for president without being able to raise that kind of money. chris: let me ask you a que
gas underground. poland may emerge as an energy giant in the 21st century which will give it leverage against germany and russia. >> let's move to the indian sub continent whoochlt i is afghanistan proving so difficult to deal with? why is the u.s. a decade into the war unable to go on patrol with afghans? >> one of the reasons is geographical. if you look at this relief map here, the border between afgh afghanistan and pakistan is very artificial. i've crossed the border many times. every time illegally. and the mountains that descend from the high table land of central asia to the steamy in this river valley, it's a very gradual descent. it's the same indough-islamic civilization on both sides of the border. so the sides that the u.s. military and diplomatic core is going to make two separate well functioning states out of it is somewhat adverse to geology. >> what's really going on, we tlinch are good guys and bad guys but there are guys the pakistans supports, the guys that india has sup pored, the russia has intended -- >> india is a big player here, fareed. because if you look t
his whole energy on behalf of the union. as late as february 1861, in the middle of the crisis of the union, lincoln professed that during my whole political life i have revered clay as a teacher and leader. he also noted clay's opposition to slavery. several times we can make clear to point to his detestation of slavery. lincoln didn't invent anti-slavery. he downplayed his ability to moderate that stance. he did detest the institution. he even did so unsuccessfully to get his state to adopt gradual emancipation. he also said that he would never force lavery word had not previously existed. yet in 1850, clay declared that if the citizens they are placed slavery in their constitutions, he would honor their choice, and he did back the compromise of 1850, which gave the possibility of slavery in the new mexico and utah territories. the clay, no other moral issue match the importance for maintenance of the union. lincoln also spoke about compromise. publicly stood for the compromise in 1850. he announced that i, too, go for saving the union. much as i hate slavery, he said, i woul
american-made energy. but we've got to be careful how we get it. design the wells to be safe. thousands of jobs. use the most advanced technology to protect our water. billions in the economy. at chevron, if we can't do it right, we won't do it at all. we've got to think long term. we've got to think long term. ♪ we'vecompanies used to see long us as demographics. we've got to think long term. because they couldn't see what made people different. today, retailers from the us to japan are using analytics to find insights in social chatter, reviews and sales transactions. helping some companies increase online revenue up to 50% by offering customers an experience as unique as they are. that's what i'm working on. i'm an ibmer. let's build a smarter planet. >> schieffer: back now with our panel. doris, i know you spent time with daniel day lewis, who gives this magnificent portrayal of lincoln in the movie. >> what he wanted to do was go to springfield as soon as he agreed to become lincoln. two years before he would begin filming, and he wanted to know where lincoln had lived. so we wal
of the department of education, get rid of the department of energy or whatever. no, reform government so it costs less. 100,000 kids in arizona will now have a $5,000 voucher, they can take to a public school, a private school, a parochial school, home school, if they don't spend it -- >> so you're saying -- >> you don't need more money, you need reforms. we've given the post office -- would allowing fedex and u.p.s. to deliver mail make your post office mail get their sooner? >> this is one of the questions on the card. when you leave here very shortly you're going to go to your wednesday meeting. this is a literal meeting of the right wing conspiracy, right? >> about this size. >> this is a weekly meeting that you've had -- >> some of the people from there are here. [laughter] i see you. >> so this is a weekly meeting of what you call the center right coalition. you have similar meetings, 60 of them, in 48 states, around the country. and this is a place where members of congress, people from think tanks, people who generally agree get together to kind of open mike, there's 150 people, sometimes
in the act of rowling his army at cedar creek. green with age, a statute conveys sheridan's electric energy. lincoln and more secretary ever stand had thought of the 33 year-old sheridan too young when grant proposed in july 1864 that he command the new army of the shenandoah. sheridan's size contributed to the impression of youth that he projected. he was just 5'5" and only 115 pounds in 1864. but as grant memorably replied to one officer commented on sheridan's diminutive stature, i think you'll find him plenty big enough for the job. just before sheridan's appointment, confederate general early and 14,000 troops have marched down the shenandoah valley, across the potomac at threatened washington, the tremendous shock, the capital was thrown into a panic, grant rushed troops to the city from his army outside petersburg, and early withdrew. to prevent a recurrence, the lincoln administration merged for military departments into a new one, with sheridan in charge of it. he was ordered to pursue jubal early's army to the death, and to destroy the shenandoah valley's grains, produce and lives
will needed by the republican party. it was very different environment. this is really going to require energy by both democrats and republicans to make it happen. what has happened in the second election cycle we've seen the rising tide of latino voters that is going to get greater. republicans have realized if they don't get latino voters in the coming election they won't have any hope. what we do know the latino voters, immigration reform is number one on the list. >> heather: matt, what do you think? >> i agree with marjorie. i hope the president shows presidential leadership. it will be up to him to move to democrats to actually bring a vote up to in the senate. i believe that john boehner is ready to work with them. address the higher immigration immigrants. we need engineers and doctors in this country. right now our policy is shipping here to be educated and then back home. >> heather: and they did make it clear after the election they were ready to get serious about overhauling the nation's immigration system, republicans, that is, and top priority for hispanics. so is taking up the s
're feeling a little slow, ♪ ♪ then 5-hour energy will help you go. ♪ ♪ so buy a bottle of pink lemonade and ♪ ♪ you can help fight breast cancer today. ♪ ♪ >> it's now 23 after the top of the hour. quick headlines for you. would you pay $99 to find out how safe your teenager is driving? that's the premise behind a new program that rolls out this week in 285 cities across our country. an off duty police officer will tail your teen for 15-20 minutes write up a full report and present the conclusions to the client. you don't want to mess with this senior citizen. 75-year-old done kiefer has had his home rob befored. when he found the man in his backyard accident take any chances. >> i told him if you try to run i am going to skewer you. >> kiefer held the man with a bow and arrow until the cops could get there. did he say skewer him? >> literally, secure him. >> thanks ainsley. lawmakers are still trying to reach a compromise on the so-called fiscal cliff. lawmakers don't know what is going to happen to our taxes this year. there are five things you can do with your money to make s
and thousands of workers are building that. or when you ro bls to make them energy efficient, there's endless amount of workers when angela merkel came over from germany and asked how did you improve your unemployment rate that quickly, she said, "we immediately made a decision to weatherize all the homes in germany." that's energy efficient but also put the employment -- unemployment rate back down to 5%. there is a relationship. >> i tnk maybe people thought "the inconvenient truth" was like that movie or "avatar." do you think there is a b environmental movie that needs to change people's minds? >> i think incon convenient truth was a terrific movie but it is screaming loud for a sequel. it exposed the problem but that's -- has not ever told us what is the solution. that's the next step i think people are waiting for. avenue abtar or inconvenient truth or many other films, i think they're very good because no matter how you put it, whether you are onhe left or the right, as eff said many times, people don't care if you are breathing republican air or democratic air. people just want to bre
am not a spy. >> if you were, you could not tell us. >> we spend a lot of time and energy making sure facebook is available. we spend a ton of time on infrastructure and hiring people to make sure that you can get to that news feed. when it comes to governments that shut the internet off, that -- there is not a lot we can do. it is interesting that young people -- i had a friend who spent time in iran wanting young people use technology. one of the things he observed is the way he put it is the average 18-year-old knows every last detail of how bluetooth works on their phone, all the internet and facebook, the ins and outs of twitter, how to change your -- and the setting so someone can message you. every last detail their understood. when he asked them to are you afraid of the government finding it, they would say they do not understand how this stuff works. it was a message that -- in places where people do need an outlet or way of communicating that is not necessarily available in the public domain. it is a completely different animal. >> we have written about this issue on the sec
everybody had a terrific thanksgiving. i know that we're just getting back and, so the energy level is probably going to be, mellow, which we'll make that work for us, since we're going to talk about what sometimes is contentious subject. today's panel is on the question of for-profits and federal education policy. this is a topic that we ad aei have been interested in and talking about for an extended stretch. the last couple of years with the generous support of the templeton foundation we have been running the private enterprise and american education project trying to think about both the opportunities and the challenges, the upsides and the downsides of having for-profits involved in k-12 and higher education. how do we make this work for kids and communities how do we think about some of the challenges and, potential perils of having for-profits involved. this panel is the close of a series of panels and conversations. we have commissioned a number about of pieces of new research which will be coming out as a book this spring with futures college press at columbia university.
they are hungry, ambitious, educating their kids coming and we cannot just refocus and marshall the energy and the priorities of our country to get ahead of it. so, we brought a speaker tonight who is extraordinarily influential and a true inspiration on this issue in an. there is a quotation that when it comes to the future there are three types of people. there's those that let it happen, those that make it happen and those that wonder what happened. our speaker tonight is kevin chavous and he makes it happen. he is a businessman, he is an attorney, he's a bit of an entrepreneur but that makes some remarkable. what makes an extraordinary is that he's a true leader. he was on the d.c. city council and helped start the felker program. he wrote a book called voices of determination which is in the back and encourage dewaal to check it out and it is a testament to how kids can be an example to adults and overcome great odds and a true inspiration for why this issue is so important and why we need to invest and read on this issue. he's also a founding member for our children and he advises go
listing the entire energy sector. what do each of you think what effect that might have and in particular how might that effect the international coalition that's negotiating with the iranians and also participating in the u.n. security council imposed sanctions? because part of the success i think over the last couple of three years is that there does appear to be greater unity amongst the p-5 plus one about the approach. so how might that affect the dynamics here if congress were to go forward? >> may i have the question? i hope it is wrong but removing the congress and try to block i would say nongovernmental dialogue, you know. it's destructive and harmful approach. catastrophe, i would say, if it's implemented. maybe it's a typical -- >> i think what you said earlier, rolf, was so important about the iraq experience and the madeline albright. you said we sanctioned a country. they sort of do what we want them to do and then someone announces, it doesn't matter what you do because we'll keep the sanctions regardless and the thing falls apart. that's the situation i fear with the u.s.
. ♪ ♪ and if you're feeling a little slow, ♪ ♪ then 5-hour energy will help you go. ♪ ♪ so buy a bottle of pink lemonade and ♪ ♪ you can help fight breast cancer today. ♪ >> you want to see where our economy is really going? financial analyst say look no further than the 1930s. we may take a trip back to the days when roosevelts election derailed from the depression. >> gretchen: stewart varney went back to the 30s and fast forward here. >> not just me. first year of fdr's second term was 1937 and it was a terrible year for the economy. dow jones industrial was cut in half . unemployment 15 percent and it was a depression within the big depression of the 1930s. is the parallels between then and now. fdr raised taxings. president obama is going to raise taxes. many of the big themed policies of the first term of fdr were implemented in the second term. same with president obama and think obama care and financial reform . attacking wall street as the villian. president roosevelt did that . wall street was the villians and shades of that exactly. 2013 president obama wall street is the villi
-g. >> it was obviously leaked by some government or by the international atomic energy agency, and the timing could be explained by a number of things. i think the key is that it shows just how sophisticated iran's thinking is on the nuclear weapons front. this is a country that is making very substantial progress. this diagram is just one of a lot of pieces of evidence, many of which i saw years ago and they still haven't come out and i'm sure other pieces of evidence have accumulated since then. jenna: can you share any of that evidence with us, just you and me and the rest of america right now? >> i can share what is already leaked out. they are working on a very sophisticated approach to weapons. take the diagram you just showed, people say, oh, but that weapon is three times more powerful and the hiroshima bomb, that shows that iran is a ways away. no not at all. that bomb was 67 years ago. jenna: one of the nuclear experts that the government relies upon, according to the "associated press" says listen this diagram is just kind of thinking about things, it's not really ao blueprint for what i
. let's start with the big screen. what is this, 50-inch. >> thin and energy efficient, l.e.d. is a premium, 899, 400 bucks off. >> what about a warranty, they offer me that extended warranty, i don't know whether to bite on it? >> if you have the money do it but otherwise pass. check your credit card, staples they will give you double the extended warranty and look at online warrant service like squaretrade.com and invest in a very good surge protector. >> laptops and tablets always big. >> windows 8 laptops out everywhere. this is an hp 14-inch 399 bucks, but i love the insides of this because it's going to last for a while. buying it for a friend, a student, this has six gigs of r.a.m., a huge hard drive and buy the most r.a.m. you can afford and hard processor. >> 399. >> 399. >> what about the tablet shz. >> a lot of tablets out there, these two are the best deal, the nook color and then the nook paper wipe. simple touch. the nook is only 99 bucks, get all the apps, movies, games and colors and can do parental profiles on this as well so if you want kids to deal with
are coming in, more numbers definitely. more energy. >> reporter: and you're look at the inbound floor of the largest of 40 fulfillment centers that amazon has across the country. when i say big, this place is big, 28 football fields, the equivalent of, and i saw a lot of people around here riding tricycles to get around and somewhere is my brother's christmas gift. hopefully he's not watching. >> diana, thanks very much. five minutes after the hour. here's savannah. >>> thanks. members of congress are back at work with one big issue staring them in the face. how to avoid going over the so-called fiscal cliff? if they do not reach a deal your taxes could rise and sharp spending cuts would go into effect as well possibly triggering a recession. chuck todd is nbc's political director and chief white house correspondent. chuck, good morning to you. >> good morning, savannah. >> the goal here is to get a deal that reduces the deficit, and the battle lines have been pretty clear right now. the president campaigned rolling back the tax breaks for the highest earnings and republicans argued s
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